Morah Sheli Village | Fine Art Friday 08.25.17: Poetry by Langston Hughes
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Fine Art Friday 08.25.17: Poetry by Langston Hughes

Hey! It’s Fine Art Friday, and I’m sharing  our first Friday of the 17-18 school year! Once a week, we rotate several fine art topics like nature, art, music, poetry and more.

 Here’s a snapshot of our lesson and activities!

 

Poetry Study:  Hughes


My children are already familiar with Hughes and his work, but I still like to review the life and accomplishments of any “great” we study. So, we began by watching a mini biography clip.

Next, we read the poem, The Negro Speaks of Rivers. I like to pair our poetry (meaning, style, etc) with another topic we currently learning about. I chose this poem because Hughes mentions the lands (and waters) by which Black people have traveled, and even more so; there is a migration pattern present. This poem selection worked out in my favor because they instantly made the connections I was hoping for in choosing this piece. After I read it, they each took turns reading as we practiced the elocution and delivery of the poem based on its meaning and mood. (Also, when we hear the same reading more than once in a sitting, it more likely we’ll remember it better.) To close out reading and reciting, we listened to Mr. Hughes recitation (as he tells the inspirations and thoughts behind writing it.)

Image result for langston hughes

Anytime I teaching about a great or well-known person, I print a nice portrait-size photo of the person to show them as we learn. (I also prompt them with a few picture study techniques so we can learn more about the person just from the photo.) After we’ve gathered that information, each of them either drew or colored (I printed color sheet) a picture of Langston Hughes. (I have one who mostly likes to draw the picture as is.) I read them a small biographical paragraph (one that had more information from the clip) while they were drawing/color and gave them some Harlem Renaissance background. One the back of their drawing, they wrote their favorite line from the poem (and explained to me why) and one fact about Hughes life or work that they learned.

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Thanks for reading!

Blessings,